Nail These 4 Core Elements for a Powerful Blog Voice

Nail these 4 core elements for a powerful blog voicePeople always say, You have to have a unique voice for your blog to be successful. And you have to blog A LOT to figure that voice out.

Which is good advice.

But what if you want to define your blogging voice now? Can it be done? I think it can, by nailing these 4 core elements.

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1. Think of 3-5 adjectives you want people to associate with your blog.

Do you want people to see you as witty? Crass? Friendly? Nerdy?

Need help figuring it out? Here’s a chart of personality adjectives  from FoxHugh.com. (Click to enlarge.)

positive-personality-adjectives-table-resized

 

 

For my own blogging voice, I want people to associate me with the adjectives warm, friendly, honest, and creative.

Need help clarifying this idea? Here are 2 examples.

Rebecca Tracey and Leonie Dawson are 2 amazing entrepreneurs, and they both have very distinctive brand and blog voices.

Rebecca’s website is The Uncaged Life.

She says she wants to “Become your new biz BFF”, and helps “Big thinkers who want to have a threesome with clarity, confidence, and action.”

When I look at her site and her blog, the adjectives that come to my mind are funny, crass, honest, down to earth and successful.

Leonie’s website is Leonie Dawson.

She calls her tribe “Love” and “Gorgeous Goddesses.”

She writes, “I’m absoloodely deeeeeelighted to meet you!” She helps “women wanting to live inspired, creative, prosperous lives and businesses.”

The adjectives that she embodies are friendly, creative, loving, and whimsical.

Once you’ve identified your adjectives, you can write them down and look at them before and after you write each blog post. Does that post reflect those adjectives? If not, you might want to tweak it a bit.

2. Ask yourself, If my blog was a physical place, where would I want it to be?

Would your blog be a serene beach, where people can clear their minds and have a place to appreciate life? Or would it be a hotel conference room during a conference, where lots of big ideas are shared and discussed?

Let’s return to the examples of Rebecca and Leonie.

When I visit Rebecca’s site, I feel like I’m at a happy hour in a funky dive bar with friends. Her photos feature her outside, in front of street art, sitting down with her laptop on her lap. On her “About” graphic, it says, “I’m pretty awesome.” All of this reinforces the feeling of having fun and being in a relaxed, casual environment.

Leonie’s site has a totally different feel. It’s filled with watercolor graphics. The fonts look like handwriting.

Here’s a bit from her About page:

I have a big, beautiful dream, dearest.

Imagine a destiny where you and me are meant to change the world.

Imagine we share our gifts with the world.

Being on her site feels like preparing for an awesome journey while sitting on the porch with a friend, sipping a cup of chai.

I want my readers to feel like they are having a great cup of coffee at a local coffee shop. Comfortable, yet excited and inspired at the same time.

Now it’s your turn. Here’s what I recommend:

Go on Pinterest, and look at boards of fabulous places. Create a pinboard of how you want people to feel when they read your blog. Then go back and revisit those places. Do any of them feel right?

Now, look at that image before and after you write your post.

BONUS: If you can create your own graphics, or get a professional to do them for you, that reflect the place you’ve chosen, it will give your blog that much more of a distinct voice.

3. Figure out what type of words you want to use.

What is the tone of your blog? Is it informal? Vulgar? Flowery? You can convey this tone by intentionally using certain words.

Rebecca uses words like dick, killing it, and shut up. These aren’t quite vulgar, but they are very slang-y. Your grandma may not approve (I guess it depends on the type of grandma you have), but if you’re young; if you’re the type of person who would go to funky dive bars, you’ll feel right at home on Rebecca’s site.

Leonie, on the other hand, uses words like incredible, shining, and gigglesnorter. Her tone is whimsical yet inspiring, and her use of specific words creates that effect.

Here’s how you can do this without sounding fake:

Pay attention to your real-life conversations. Notice which words you use frequently. Then write them down. Intentionally incorporate some of them into your next blog post.

4. Look at your blog’s adjectives, place, and words, and figure out who would enjoy reading your blog.

To recap, you’ve decided:

  • Your blog adjectives
  • Your blog place
  • Your commonly used words

Now, can you picture someone who would want to read your blog?

Back to Rebecca and Leonie…

Rebecca’s adjectives: funny, crass, honest, down to earth and successful

Rebecca’s place: a funky dive bar

Rebecca’s words: dick, killing it, and shut up

Who would want to read her blog?

Probably millennials who want to start their own businesses. People who have a good sense of humor and want to take action now. Entrepreneurs who want a mentor that is no-nonsense and ready to get her hands dirty.

Leonie’s adjectives: friendly, creative, loving, and whimsical

Leonie’s place: preparing for an awesome journey while sitting on the porch with a friend, sipping a cup of chai

Leonie’s words: incredible, shining, and gigglesnorter

Who would want to read her blog?

Women of all ages who want to be inspired. These women have an artsy, spiritual side but are also planners and doers. They’re creatives and entrepreneurs who want a mentor who will make them feel special and taken care of.

Now, it’s your turn.

Look at your adjectives, place, and words. Who would want to read your blog? Write a few sentences about them.

That’s your audience. If you can choose one person who fits into that audience, and write for her specifically, it will make your blog voice even stronger.

Adjectives. Place. Words. Audience. Get those building blocks in place and you’ll be on your way to a kick-ass blog voice!

 

Define Your Online Voice (Free Course)

Take my scrumptious 5 day course on how to define your blog voice.  You’ll learn how to think about your blog, and your voice, in a whole new way. Just enter your name and email address and you’ll get the course delivered to your inbox. It’s only free for a limited time.

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  • Brilliant. Concise. Informative. Actionable. Thank you for this awesome post.

    The first two adjectives that come to mind for my own blog are: Honest and Transformative. I hope my sense of humor comes through with nearly every post because I don’t take myself too seriously. And the two places I see us (me and my readers) hanging out are at my favorite craft beer and wine tapas bar or my favorite organic coffee shop 🙂

    xo
    Peggy

    • Daniela

      Thanks Peggy!

      I love craft beer and organic coffee, and I love your blog! It is exactly what you want it to be – honest and transformative.

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  • Inspiring, vibe raising and love the examples.
    My adjectives are inspiring, transforming and colorful
    I see us hanging out in a magical creative retreat by the beach
    My word are heart whisper, abundance, creativity and self-love

    Thanks for the inspiration

    • Daniela

      Thanks Suzie! I love your answers! Especially heart whisper…

  • What a great way to look at this! You’ve given me some food for thought.

    My adjectives would be: offbeat, funny, honest, empathetical.
    My place is a sacred fire.
    My words are: sister, yo, heart, soul, mission, purpose, healer.

    Thanks!
    Sue

    • Daniela

      Thanks for sharing, Sue! I love how you wrote both “yo” and “healer.” On the surface, they don’t seem to go together, but it’s the mix of contrasting ideas that give us our writer’s voice!

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